somehow, through no intention on my part, i watch britains got talent every year

theplumedpilot asked:

Hallo there, I just want to say, I am so in love with your SPG poster that you made of them being WWII pilots. You don't know how much happy it brings me! And it's so wonderfully done too! :3 and if you couldn't tell I am a WWII/robot/spg/aeroplane/pilot fan. Your art is perfect in general. Welp, I thought I'd just drop by to say that one little nice thing for ya! Have a nice day!

Oh thank you thank you, you are so sweet, I’m glad people are still getting enjoyment out of that. I did a bit of research for it so I am very happy you like it so much and that you like my art in general. Thank you!

henrithepainter:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!
IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!
Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.
Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.  If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.

If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions

PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

This grows mostly in Washington, Oregon, then most of the upper eastern states [Ohio, New York, Maryland, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, etc.].
From what I’ve seen [in Washington], most of the time they’re just tiny little flowers on the side of the road or creeks [the size of your finger]. For those, the sap causes a lot of burning and itching sensations, which last for days.
I can only imagine these types of reactions listed above from bigger versions.
Zoom Info
henrithepainter:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!
IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!
Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.
Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.  If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.

If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions

PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

This grows mostly in Washington, Oregon, then most of the upper eastern states [Ohio, New York, Maryland, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, etc.].
From what I’ve seen [in Washington], most of the time they’re just tiny little flowers on the side of the road or creeks [the size of your finger]. For those, the sap causes a lot of burning and itching sensations, which last for days.
I can only imagine these types of reactions listed above from bigger versions.
Zoom Info

henrithepainter:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!

IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.

Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.

If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
  • Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
  • If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
  • See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.
If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions
PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

This grows mostly in Washington, Oregon, then most of the upper eastern states [Ohio, New York, Maryland, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, etc.].

From what I’ve seen [in Washington], most of the time they’re just tiny little flowers on the side of the road or creeks [the size of your finger]. For those, the sap causes a lot of burning and itching sensations, which last for days.

I can only imagine these types of reactions listed above from bigger versions.

theserif:

Things I think we should start at concerts.  “Convention badges.” 

The furry fandom has these.  A drawing of your “fursona” and your name, so people know who you are.

We should do that for SPG concerts too.  Art of your fanbot/Kazoolander/character, and their name/your URL so that internet people can know who you are right away.  Would make finding people much easier, and show off our characters.

Also a great way to show off great art.  We have so many AMAZING artists in this fandom, it’d be cool to see more art at live shows.

oh this is the one i should have reblogged